Conférence de Sheldon Wiederhorn (National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA)


 AHLeGall    15/09/2016 : 21:55

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Le jeudi 15 septembre 2016 à 10h00, salle de conférences de l'OSUR (RDC bâtiment 14B, Campus de Beaulieu, UR1), à l'invitation de l'IPR, Sheldon Wiederhorn propose une conférence exceptionnelle intitulée "Water Strengthening of Silica Glass"

Le jeudi 15 septembre 2016 à 10h00, salle de conférences de l'OSUR (RDC bâtiment 14B, Campus de Beaulieu, UR1), à l'invitation de l'IPR, Sheldon Wiederhorn propose une conférence exceptionnelle intitulée "Water Strengthening of Silica Glass"

Résumé :

From work of Le Chatelier [1884], it is well known that chemical reactions that exhibit a change in volume are sensitive to the ambient pressure of the reaction. Increasing the pressure will alter the ratio of reactant products to reactants. If the change in volume is constrained, then such reactions can result in external stresses that affect the strength of the solid. These effects are applicable to silica glass, which increases in volume when reacting with water. In this talk, we discuss the possibility of using this effect to strengthen silica glass. We show that water penetration into the surface of silica glass can yield sufficient residual stress to significantly increase both the strength and toughness of the glass

About Sheldon M. Wiederhorn:

Sheldon M. Wiederhorn received his B.S. Degree in Chemical Engineering from Columbia University in 1956 and his M.S. (1958) and Ph.D. (1960) in Chemical Engineering from the University of Illinois. His first job was with E.I. Du Pont De Nemours & Co. where his research interests turned towards the study of the mechanical behavior of ceramic materials. After three years, he was hired by the National Bureau of Standards to carry out an independent research program on the mechanical behavior of glasses and ceramic materials.

At the National Bureau of Standards, now the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Dr Wiederhorn carried out a program on the mechanical reliability of brittle materials. He was one of the first to apply fracture mechanics techniques to study the fracture of ceramic materials. A consequence of his research was the development of techniques to assure the structural reliability of brittle ceramic materials. Techniques pioneered by Dr Wiederhorn and his colleagues are now used to assure the reliability of glass windows in airplanes, space-vehicles and related applications.

Contact :

Sheldon Wiederhorn (National Institute of Standards and Technology)